Imprisoned

Twitter

(This is an excerpt from My Name Used to be Muhammad by Tito Momen and Jeff Benedict.)

It was pretty clear why I was in so much trouble—my religion. The authorities had it in for me because I was a Christian. They were convinced that I was trying to persuade others to do what I had done—convert from Islam.

My roommates denied this, insisting I had never talked to them about Christianity.

They were telling the truth. I had never introduced any of my Muslim roommates to my religious beliefs. The authorities didn’t want to believe it, though, and they were determined to prove otherwise.

My roommates stuck to their story. But over the next few weeks, the police interviewed numerous students from Al-Azhar. They told a different story—namely that I had been actively trying to convert people to my new religion.

That was a lie. Not one Al-Azhar student could point to a specific instance where I had approached someone about Christianity. But that didn’t matter. The authorities released my acquaintances, and I was sent to a place referred to as the Investigations Prison, where accused criminals were held until they got a hearing.

(Tito Momen, My Name Used to be Muhammad: The True Story of a Muslim Who Became a Christian [Salt Lake City: Ensign Peak, 2013], 212–13).

Twitter

Conversations

Fridge Quotes:

Seek by Deseret Book